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Unleashed – PAWsitive Stories from Salt Lake County Animal Services

april national heartworm awareness


April 04, 2019

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2019_prevent_heartworm

Spring is here and with spring we see buds popping out, flowers beginning to blossom and our pets getting to spend more time enjoying being outside. April is National Heartworm Awareness Month, and Salt Lake County Animal Services wants pet owners to be ready to protect their pets year round!

Spring brings with in an invasion of mosquito larvae which grow to adults that spread heartworm disease from dog to dog and cat to cat. A grown adult mosquito can drink 1 1/2 times their body weight. Salt Lake City is # 1 among the top 10 cities in the country for a percentage increase in the number of dogs testing positive for the disease.

Heartworm infection has been detected in all 50 states. In January 2019 in the Salt Lake Area, 666 dogs were tested, of those only one dog tested positive for heartworm. In February, 675 dogs were tested, 11 tested positive. These may not be high numbers but there is an increasing prevalence that is very concerning.

The disease is caused by a foot-long worm that lives in the heart, lungs and associated blood vessels of the affected animal. When a mosquito bites an infected animal and then bites an uninfected animal, the larvae are deposited onto the surface of the animals’ skin and enter through the wound. Once inside the host, it takes approximately 6 months for the larvae to mature into adult heartworms. Once mature, heartworms can live for 5-7 years. This can cause lung disease, heart failure and damage to other organs. If left untreated several hundred adults will infiltrate the heart and lungs and eventually will result in death.

In the early stages of the disease, animals show few or no symptoms. That’s why prevention is the best approach. Initial signs of heartworm disease in dogs may include: Mild persistent cough, inactivity, fatigue, loss of appetite and weight loss

Initial signs of heartworm disease in cats may include: Coughing or asthma like symptoms, periodic vomiting, lack of appetite, and/or weight loss.

It only takes one heartworm infected animal to substantially increase the number of infected mosquitoes that can transmit heartworm parasites.

With changing climates that are extending the mosquitoes breeding season heartworm disease in dogs and cats will only continue to rise. There are currently 70 varieties of mosquitoes that spread heartworm disease.

Heartworm disease is almost 100% preventable. You will need to have your dog or cat tested for heartworm disease before administering a preventative. It is a simple test that is administered by your veterinarian. The test requires a small blood sample and works by detecting the presence of heartworm proteins.

You need to test annually even if your animal is on a preventative. The medicines are highly effective, but it is necessary to test to confirm they are working. Heartworm disease is a dangerous and progressive disease.

For more information on the top 10 cities that have experienced an increase in heartworm disease follow this link: http://www.petsandparasites.org/about-capc/top-ten-cities-reports/

If you are interested in having a heartworm test done for your animal, please contact your veterinarian.

To find out more information on Heartworm disease : https://www.heartwormsociety.org/


where are they now fifi


March 21, 2019

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2019_fifi

At Salt Lake County Animal Services we love getting updates on our pets that have been adopted from the shelter. Here is Fifi's story. If you have a story you would like to share about your pet that you adopted from us please email adoptions@slco.org.


Fifi came into our family in 2010. We adopted her from Salt Lake County Animal Services. 

She was a great older puppy...we got her at around 5 or 6 months if I remember correctly. She was smart, learned where/how to potty train quickly and was an always ever present little chica with our 4 boys... 2 of which were 3 and 2 yrs old when she came into our home. She loved to go to the park and run everywhere with the boys as they practiced for basketball, football, and baseball. She was a tiny speeding bullet as fast as she was!! She always loved to tag along with the boys.

Life has been great with Fifi. She loved to play and had lots of fun as a puppy. She even loved to stay up late and watch late night movies on weekends. 

Now... at 9 years old... Fifi is an older lady and just wants to lounge. She is still playful now and then...but not for very long. She loves to lay in the sun on the backyard grass on warm summer days... but most of all, she loves her bed and blanket. She loves her naps and loves her people but she is slowly heading toward her twilight years and she now loves the slower pace of naps and good food from her boys. 

Even as an older gal, she is ALWAYS quick to defend home and hearth from anyone who knocks at "her" front door or comes into her house. The years just melt away... she becomes the feisty quick footed girl that she was as a youngster when someone knocks at our door or comes into the house. When we let her know that all is well, she walks back to her bed with a little side eye for whomever is visiting our home at the moment. She is our little guard dog and has lots of heart. In her youth she once tried to defend one of the boys from a large dog who she thought was a threat. Eventually she was picked up off the ground and held out of reach of the bigger dog, and the  owner caught their dog but we've always known that she does not lack courage.

We love Fifi and hope she is around in 10 more years so we can let you know that shes still around... at the moment, she is loving her life of ease and contentment 😊😁

Sincerely,

Verlinda & Family


volunteer of the month karen seifert


March 21, 2019

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poison prevention month


March 08, 2019

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Understanding what potential and harmful pet poisons exist in your home and yard is the first step in keeping your pets safe. At Salt Lake County Animal Services, we want to help you keep your pets healthy and happy!

Pets can become ill by ingesting many common household foods, product and plants. Inspecting your home (Outside included) can help reduce the risk. Pets are curious and often cannot resist smelling, tasting and even sometimes swallowing foods, plants and other items that are of interest to them.

“Poison-proofing” your home is important, and you can take some very simple steps to secure areas and significantly reduce the chance of your dog or cat coming into contact with a toxic substance. There are numerous household food and products that can be toxic to pets.

 Here are a some of them:

*Alcohol

*Bones

*Caffeine

*Chocolate

*Grapes and Raisins

*Medicine/supplements (IE: Ib profen, acetaminophen)

*Onions/garlic/Chives/leeks/shallots

*Macadamia nuts

*Unbaked bread yeast dough

*Table salt

*Xylitol

*Mice and rat poisons

*Snail Bait

*Lawn pesticides

*Antifreeze

*Glue (IE: Gorilla Glue)

*Household plants 

 

The ASPCA has put together a list on their website of poisonous substances including plants, human foods, human medications and more:  https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/animal-poison-control

Symptoms of accidental poisoning. Some symptoms will result in an immediate reaction while others may take several days. Here are some general symptoms to looks for:

*Drooling, vomiting, loss of appetite, diarrhea

*Lethargy, weakness

*Pale or yellowish gums,

*Excessive Thirst

*Nervousness, hyperactivity, muscle tremors, seizure, coma

If you think your pet has ingested something harmful please act immediately. Contact your Veterinarian or the Pet Poison Helpline for assistance. Timely and accurate identification of the substance is very important. If you have the container or package in hand it can save very valuable time and may save your pets life.


where are they now max and thunder


February 27, 2019

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Max and Thunder were adopted from Salt Lake County Animal Services in 2014. Here's an update from their family and how much they love them! Our staff loves to hear how adoption has changed lives of both pets and people. 

We got these two about 5 years ago. Max is the black and white one. He used to be Martin and his adoption photo showed him cowering in the back of his kennel. He was skinny as a rail and estimated to be 3 years in age. He was friendly and purred instantly when pet. His first couple of months at home we had to hide the loaves of bread because we used to find them ripped open in the living room and the bread eaten. What kind of life had he previously had that he knew how to do that? He's fatter and still kind, but turns his nose up at anything but his Purina cat chow. We've had to take him to the vet a time or two and we always get complimented on what a good cat he is. He"s never growled, hissed, bit, or scratched a vet tech even during the uncomfortable parts of an exam. He's been absolutely lovely to my kids. 

Thunder is the tabby. His name used to be Poseidon and he had one of those glam photo shots. He was standing,  eyes wide,  ears perked, with shiny Mardi Gras beads draped about his neck. In person he was cute, fluffy, and soft. We found out he had been adopted but recently returned after a few days. We took him home and marveled how anyone could take this lovable guy back. Turns out Thunder is a furniture scratcher. He tore up my brand new couches and chair that I had saved up for months to buy. Alas, kitty claws, double sided tape, and a brand new 5 foot tall cat tree did nothing to help. I even bought some cat calming spray. To be fair he does use the cat scratchers. It's just too bad he equally uses my couches. We love him though. He's unique in that he doesn't mind being touched or held. He'll rest his head on you like a dog. I've never known a cat to let you touch him on your terms, not their's. He's a sweet boy. 

~ Cindy

We love hearing about how pets adopted from Salt Lake County Animal Services are doing. If you've adopted from us and want to share your story, please email adoptions@slco.org.



2019 valentines top10


February 04, 2019

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10 ideas for you and your pup this Valentine’s Day

Why not skip the stressful dinner reservations and overpriced gifts and take some time out for the one the always gives you undivided attention and unconditional love: your dog. Here's some ideas from Salt Lake County Animal Services to treat yourself and your pup.


1.Treat Yourselves

Enjoy a little Valentine Day treat, or just treat your guilty pleasure any time of the year. We all deserve a little something now and again. Several places have special doggy treats on their menu.

Here are few for you both to enjoy:

Starbucks-add a Puppuccino to your order (A little whipped cream in a small cup.)

In -N- Out Burger-Ask for the “Pup Patty” for your furry friend (Unseasoned burger in a signature doggy bag.)

Shake Shack- Pooch-ini (Peanut butter sundae with a dog biscuit) or a handful of biscuits to choose from by Bocce’s Bakery in NYC.

Dairy Queen- A Pup Cup (Free with purchase)- Doggy-sized portion of vanilla ice cream.


2.Check out a dog friendly Café or Restaurant

Need a coffee fix? Maybe some dinner and drinks? There are several dog friendly cafés and restaurants in the valley that you can have your best friend by your side while you enjoy a cup of java or a drink and some dinner.

Here are approved restaurants who allow dogs on their patios in Salt Lake.

Brewhouse Pub, Campfire Lounge, Caputos 15th & 15th, Fisher Brewing Company, Proper Burger, Squatters, Taqueria 27, Pig and a Jelly Jar and Flatbread Neapolitan Pizzeria.


3.Enjoy some retail therapy

Go on a fun trip to one of your local pet stores and pick out a fun new toy or treat.

 

4.Take a hike

You can get out and burn off those guilty pleasures you enjoyed. There are many on and off leash hikes to enjoy. Make sure you bring plenty of water for both you and your pup.


5.Make some new friends

If your dog is social with other dogs, take an outing to your local dog park and let out some energy. Who knows you may just make a dog loving new friend as well.

 

6.Have a picnic

Most dogs love walks and treats. Why not combine them and have a fun picnic outing? Grab a blanket, some dog friendly snacks and their favorite toy for a post-picnic play time. If the weather is not permitting, you can always save this one for a nicer day.


7. Take in a movie

The truth is your dog loves spending time with you and a quiet night on the couch with some popcorn and blankets can be relaxing for you both. In the summer you can head out and enjoy a movie under the stars at many of our Summer movie nights in the park.


8.Go swimming

If your dog loves to swim, don’t let the winter weather stop you from getting out and having some fun. Barley's Recreation Center has an indoor pool just for dogs! Your dog can have a swim session, a massage, acupuncture, behavior training and even get a bath


9.Check out a concert

This one may be more of a summer time activity but there are many outdoor venues that you can take your pup too. We recommend something not too loud, as we all know loud noises can frighten our four-legged friends.


10.Have a Nice Dinner at home

Nothing like a cozy night in with your best friend. Maybe you can skip their normal bag or canned food and cook something that would be dog friendly. Just be mindful of food sensitivities and keep the portions appropriate for your dog’s size.

 

If you are looking for a new friend to add to your family look at the wonderful dogs, cats and rabbits waiting to be adopted at Salt Lake County Animal Services.


feb_volunteer


January 28, 2019

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where are they now feb19


January 28, 2019

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Sweet little Peanut was adopted from Salt Lake County Animal Services in October of 2018. Here's an update from his new family! Our staff loves to hear how adoption has changed lives of both pets and people. 

We adopted Peanut in October of 2018! We love him just as much as he loves us! He loves to play and is spoiled rotten like his other 4-legged sister. He now has a harness. He has so many toys that he enjoys playing with. He enjoys tug-a-war. He likes to run around the house chasing his big brother and sister! He thinks it's funny to drive his little 4-legged sister up the wall! He really is the best puppy! Loves to go for car rides loves to go for runs with his 2-legged sister! He loves his treats! Potty training is going pretty good! He loves to cuddle and sleep with me when he's tired out from playing or needs a nap. I could go on and on! He really is a great dog and we are so happy we found him!  A few weeks ago, I found out my older dog had an aggressive cancer and had to put her to sleep.

I knew I wanted another dog so I left my heart open and knew when the time was right, I would find another dog that I could feel an instant connection with. I thought a lot about shelter dogs, and we adopted a Chihuahua mix from the Humane Society of Utah and she has been an amazing dog. If I could I would adopt all the dogs and give them a forever home. I was sad to see so many dogs at the shelter. Long story short, I felt adoption was best for my family because so many dogs need a good home. The day I found Peanut I was at Salt Lake Animal Services to pay the registration on my other dog and I walked through the dogs and saw him. Right away I felt so much love and knew he was going to be my dog and that's what happened. Ever since that day he has brought so much more happiness into our lives!

~ Amber

We love hearing about how pets adopted from Salt Lake County Animal Services are doing. If you've adopted from us and want to share your story, please email adoptions@slco.org.

 


top 10 resolutions 2019


January 10, 2019

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Top 10 New Year’s resolutions for you and your pet

It is hard to believe but it's that time of year again, the time we make New Year’s Resolutions. It's easy to allow many of the promises we make to ourselves fizzle out, so why not try something new this year and make resolutions for you and your dog!

Here are a few ideas from Salt Lake County Animal Services to help you and your dog have a healthy and happy year ahead and you never know maybe by fulfilling your dog’s resolutions it will inspire you to keep a few of your own.

1. Get Healthy

This seems to the number one resolution us humans set for ourselves year to year. Well this resolution can apply to your dog as well. Maybe the hustle and bustle of the holidays and the cold weather have kept you from those daily walks. Now is the perfect time to get back on track.

Weather not permitting? Look at some indoor exercises and activities you can do together.

2. Kick bad habits

Maybe your dog is still begging for food at the table or could use some work on leash manners. Dedicate this year to getting a handle on bad habits, whatever they may be. Helping your dog to be the best dog that he/she can be will reduce stress and make for a healthier and happier household.

3. Meet new friends

I am sure you have heard how important it is to socialize your dog as a puppy, truth is it is vital to do so at all stages of your dog’s life. Consider scheduling a play date with one of your friendly neighborhood dogs or visiting a local doggy day care or dog park. You never know, in the process you may just expand your own social circle.

4. Learn something new

Whether you have an adult dog who has not learned any new commands in a while or a puppy who needs training, teach your dog something new this year. It is a lot of fun for you and your dog to show off their skills; they're learning important commands and getting mind work in the process.

5. Pay it forward

Maybe your dog has the right temperament to become a therapy animal. Dogs have a natural selflessness about them and just want to be loved. You both might enjoy volunteering your time to schools, hospitals or your local library for a kids reading program.

6. Discover a new hobby

Picking up an activity can help to boost your dog’s physical and mental well-being. Not sure what to look for? Consider sports like K9 Nose work, dock diving, agility or fly-ball.

7. Take a trip

Been thinking about a road trip? There's no time like the present! Take a look at some dog travel trips and hit the road with your best friend for an adventure you will both remember.

8. Make sure to go to the doctor

This is truly one of your most important resolutions. If you have been putting off scheduling your vet appointment, don’t wait any longer. Regular exams and preventive care are essential and can help you to catch many health problems before they progress.

9. Consider fostering

Fostering is an amazing way to help a dog in need. Your dog can be a wonderful teacher to a dog who is hoping to find a forever home and help them to learn important skills that they can’t in a kennel in a shelter. Fostering provides valuable information to a potential adopter. Dogs are truly the best teachers to other dogs.

10. Send an update

One of our favorite resolutions is promising to reconnect with the people we have lost touch with. You can do the same for your dog. If you adopted your dog from a shelter or rescue send them an update and let them know how he/she is doing. Staff, volunteers, and fosters LOVE updates and to see pictures of them enjoying their forever home.

Find out more about Salt Lake County Animal Services foster program and FREE behavior workshops on our "calendar" page. Questions? Email animal@slco.org.


january 2019 where are they ash


January 02, 2019

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Meet Ash, he was adopted from Salt Lake County Animal Services in 2018 and he is doing wonderful in his new home!

Ash was originally "just a foster" but having him in our home brought out his great qualities that you can't teach a dog to have. He is affectionate, great with my nieces and nephews, loves to please us, excels at learning new tricks, is good with other dogs and is good off leash. These good qualities were hidden in the shelter by his barrier reactivity and separation anxiety and every time I left him at best friends society it broke my heart to see these negative qualities brought out and his sense of security dwindle. At first I thought that it would be unfair to adopt him while living in an apartment but the longer we kept the more we realized that we were the best family for him and that he was happy with us. We became so attached to him and he became so attached to us that he already was ours and we had to adopt him. 

Nowadays Ash is known as Ashton or when he's playful we call him Sharky. He loves to go hiking and running and his stamina has come a long way since his terrible bout of kennel cough. His furthest distant running to date is 7 miles and he stayed strong. Our favorite trail is Desolation and he loves jumping from rock to rock at the overlook like a mountain goat. His all time favorite game is chase and I haven't seen any dog at the park faster than he is. He has a neighbor girlfriend who is a border collie named Mylah (she chases the ball and he chases her its a perfect combo!). I am no longer worried about him being unhappy in an apartment, it is obvious he has the most activities of any other dog I know. We love him so much and I can't believe how much joy he brings us! - Lindsey

We love hearing about how pets adopted from Salt Lake County Animal Services are doing. If you've adopted from us and want to share your story, please email adoptions@slco.org.


january 2019 volunteer


January 02, 2019

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Interested in volunteering? Email animalvolunteer@slco.org. Or visit our volunteer page for more information.